An In-Depth Look At How ESPN Captured Clemson Football’s Incredible Entrance

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Clemson football’s entrance into a game is no ordinary entrance. The team doesn’t just come out from the locker room and run out onto the field. Instead, they go out the back of their locker room, up a ramp, and load onto buses that drive them to another side of the stadium where they touch Howard’s rock and run down the hill (only a matter of time before someone tears an ACL). Last Saturday, ESPN made sure it was captured right. They nailed it.

To be able to capture that took a lot of planning and tons of resources. For instance, ESPN normally will use around 15 cameras for a game to get all their necessary shots. For the Louisville-Clemson game, ESPN had a whopping 24 cameras in use and a camera crew of 200 in order to pump out a high-quality production like that entrance.

One of the cameras brought in was a technocrane, so they could get shots of the east side of Death Valley. This type of camera is typically used on movie sets, not used at your typical sporting event.

This is far from normal from your typical production you’d see from a TV crew. Normally, a production truck will roll in the day before to prepare for the game, making sure everything is in check with master control and everything is in working order. ESPN needed an extra day of preparation to get this done and even began planning with Clemson the week prior when they were playing Georgia Tech.

ESPN had to coordinate with local police and the fire department due to the thousands of fans that pack the streets to cheer, because these cameras had to navigate through them. They also had to get special cameras inside the buses that are typically used in NASCAR races.

Putting together a TV production is a hassle without having to deal with this, so well done by ESPN to be able to put this together and put it together really well.

[via SB Nation]


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