Attending College Does Not Lead To Alcoholism In Adults, Penn State Study Shows

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Nice Move

Remember when you were a kid riding in the back seat of the family car, with your parents in the front, and when you pulled up to a stoplight you were approached by a panhandling homeless person who looked like shit run over twice and smelled even worse, and your parents dropped that classic Parenting 101 line on you: “See kids, that’s what’ll happen if you don’t stay in school”? We all heard that one, and we also probably just brushed it off, because at that age we all just assumed it was a scare tactic, because who wouldn’t stay in school? It was a no-brainer.

Well, it turns out they weren’t only talking about the fact that he hadn’t showered in months, ate back alley throw-away food, carried multiple diseases, and lived under a highway overpass; they were also warning you about the strong three dollar pint of bourbon stench he was emitting as a byproduct of his unrelenting dedication to alcoholism.

A recent study conducted by Penn State University reveals some interesting information about the American college student. As it turns out, according to the study, college students — despite a four or five year hiatus as semi-professional binge drinkers — are less likely to turn into drunks in their years of adulthood.

From Penn State:

The researchers found that college enrollment may actually prevent adult substance abuse among youth who might not be expected to attend college because of factors such as low household income and low maternal education. Specifically, they found that adults would be more than six times more likely to engage in problem drinking at age 33 if they did not attend college, compared to if they did attend.

Score another one for the college-educated.

Read more details of the study here.

[via Penn State]

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