Cops Warn Public About Drunk Driving On Cinco De Mayo, Are Forced To Retract Warning For Missing True Meaning Of Holiday

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Nice Move

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Like any holiday celebrated by throwing back dangerous amounts of alcohol, the police are out in full force on Cinco de Mayo to prevent drunk driving. But so are the PC Police, and they don’t take too kindly to cops suggesting that the day is about drinking while overlooking the true meaning of Cinco de Mayo: the invention of the Old El Paso Home Taco Kit. (After the historic date, never again were people forced into the cold, dark streets in search of meaty, cheesy deliciousness — the authentic Mexican flavors could be whipped up from the comforts of our own homes).

But seriously, the cops made an online post warning about drunk driving on Cinco de Mayo since it’s, you know, a fact that people drink a lot on May 5. The cops even had the foresight to acknowledge the true meaning of Cinco de Mayo in the post.

From National Review:

It’s important to note that there was was absolutely nothing offensive about the warning. In fact, its second sentence actually reminded everyone that “historically, the fifth of May commemorates Mexico’s 1862 victory over France at the Battle of Puebla during the Franco-Mexican War” before explaining that that since “present-day celebrations often lead to drunk driving,” there would be increased DUI enforcement on the road, and people should remember to arrange safe transportation if they planned to celebrate.

Is that not the most PC drunk driving warning you’ve ever seen? The strength of the warning is even watered down by fluffing it up with all that Mexican historical knowledge. Nevertheless, it still wasn’t good enough for the PC police, who demanded the warning be taken down. The real police obliged, following the removal of the post with a lengthy apology.

The Oakland Police Department would like to apologize for the recent press release addressing traffic safety enforcement during the Cinco de Mayo holiday. We acknowledge that the language in the message sent was completely insensitive to the cultural holiday. We have worked extensively to build trust with all our communities and value the amazing cultures that make up the heart of our City. We are taking appropriate steps to insure that this does not happen again. Our intentions were to raise awareness about drunk driving and notify the community of traffic safety during the important holiday. As for every holiday and celebration, we want to remind everyone to celebrate responsibly and safely.

What the fuck do you want from us, PC police???

I like to think that every time someone sees an effective anti-drunk driving advertisement, that maybe, just maybe, a few people will think twice about leaving the bar and getting behind the wheel (some of the more brutal ads have certainly had that effect on me). I also like to think that the advertising efforts may even save a few lives. But at the end of the day, I guess that doesn’t really matter if irrational people’s feelings are hurt.

[via National Review]

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