Deleting Your Browser History Can Send You To Court, Time To Lawyer Up

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Nice Move

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I’m grounded in a specific online browsing routine. I light a few candles, turn on some John Legend, pull up the Hub, squirt a dollop of lotion in my hand, and go to town on myself. When I’m finished, I always delete my browser history. It’s a habit I became accustomed to after my poor grandmother borrowed my laptop to research potting soil, only to accidentally pull up “Cumshot Compilation May 2008.” Her screams haunt me to this day.

I have always been under the impression that a thorough scrubbing of my browser history is a perfectly legal thing to do, but then I read this headline on AOL: “Deleting your browser history could land you in court.”

I’m screwed. I can only hold out for so long without letting anyone use my laptop. Inevitably, someone other than me is going to punch in a few keys on the search bar and prompt a list of absolutely vile suggestions to pop up. I’m going to just have to shrug my shoulders tell them, “Yup, I’m into that.”

But then I read on…

“The Sarbanes-Oxley Act was initially created to combat corporate accounting scandals, like those of Enron and Worldcom in the late 1990s. Fast forward to today, and the law has become the basis for prosecuting individuals who delete their browser history if that browser history is considered evidence in a federal trial.”

Phew. Okay. As long as my laptop isn’t needed in a federal trial, I can clear away.

Dammit, AOL. Don’t scare me like that again.

[via AOL]

Image via Shutterstock


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