Infograph: Which States Produce The Best College Football Players?

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Because college football fans don’t already have enough to fight over, ESPN decides to throw gas on this ever-burning inferno of arguments. Next topic: which states produce the best talent?

From ESPN:

Question: Where do the best college football players come from?

Follow-up: Where did the best college football players come from a few decades ago?

Last question: Has there been a sizable change?

To find the answers, ESPN’s RecruitingNation scanned the rosters of the nation’s top programs in 1940, 1950, 1960, 1970, 1980, 1990, 2000 and 2010, looking at the home states of the players who comprised these teams.

From there, ESPN and InfographicWorld.com divided the results into two maps: One showing players from 1940 to 1970, and the other from 1980 to 2010.

Below are the findings (further explained in this Insider-only chart). Chief among them: Texas rules. Pennsylvania and Ohio, too? Maybe back in the day. But now it’s California and Florida that join the Lone Star State atop the recruiting chart.

[via ESPN]

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Roger_Dorn

Roger Dorn (@RogerJDorn) is the Vice President of Media for Grandex, Inc. He's a native Texan with a full head of hair and knows his way around a nice box of red wine. Dorn graduated (BBA) with a GPA sitting in the meaty part of the bell curve, not lagging behind, but not trying to show off, either. Golf is his game now. He's long off the tee but can't putt for shit. Email: dillon@grandex.co

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  1. 1
    RickyRubibro

    I was surprised to see that Indiana was in the middle… Make this basketball and we would be as red as that incurable gonorrhea strain.

    ^ ThisTake a lapReply • 2 years ago
  2. 1
    gatorjoe95

    I’d really like to know which states produce the best scientists, engineers, doctors, etc. You know, the people who carry the weight of human survival and progress on their backs. I’m guessing in that kind of a map Texas would not be so deeply red.

    ^ ThisTake a lapReply • 2 years ago

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