Most College Students Think ‘Study Pills’ Make Them Smarter And Are Easy To Get, Says Unnecessary Study

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Nice Move


A new survey out of Ohio State University says a lot of students take prescription drugs to help them study, and the drugs are really easy to find for those who aren’t prescribed them. Ya don’t say?

The study surveyed 27,495 undergraduate and graduate students at eight universities. Only 3,918 students responded, probably because they didn’t pop their study buddies before taking the survey. It found 18 percent of students used stimulants for non-medical reasons. Of those 18 percent, 85 percent thought the study aids helped them study or improve grades. Additionally, seven out of 10 college students said it was easy to find the stimulants even if you didn’t have a prescription.


The drugs – Ritalin, Adderall and Dexedrine – are described by many students as ‘smart drugs,’ and that is a problem, said Kenneth Hale, a professor of pharmacy at Ohio State and associate director of the Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Drug Misuse Prevention and Recovery, which is based at the university.

‘They are not cognitive enhancers – it is cognitive compensation,’ he said. ‘They haven’t gone to class or done the work and need to cram and pull an all-nighter.’

Whoa. Slow your fucking roll, buddy.

I’m sorry you spent too much time and money on your study when you could’ve asked ten people on any college campus and gotten the same results.

The study was conducted in the spring of 2015 by Ohio State’s Center for the Study of Student Life and in cooperation with the National Center for Alcohol and Drug Misuse Prevention.


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