South Carolina FIJI Spends Spring Break Donating Bone Marrow To Cancer Patient

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If you weren’t an intoxicated slob on the floor of a beach town jail cell at any point during your spring break week, consider it a successful vacation. As many chose to steer clear of the newly founded North Korean colonies of Panama City Beach and Gulf Shores, quite a few of you degenerates dove headfirst into the fire and prayed for survival.

As you threw footballs at the assholes driving Gulf Shores Police vehicles (they definitely deserved it) and played cat-and-mouse with your beach house rental agency, Stephen Corbitt was gearing up for surgery that will hopefully save the life of a young cancer patient.

From The Daily Independent:

Stephen Corbitt didn’t spend his spring break like the normal college student.

He was busy giving a young boy who lives somewhere in the United States a chance to beat cancer.

Corbitt’s spring break included a stay in the University of South Carolina Medical Center in Charleston, S.C., where he was donating bone marrow.

Corbitt knows little about the recipient.

“All I know is it’s a young boy with cancer,” he said. “I dont know his name or location.”

Even with the mystery, the idea that the bone marrow transplant may save the young boy is emotional for everyone involved.

“Kind of how everyone is,” said his mother, Elaine Corbitt. “This child has become our child, a family or community child. Everyone wants a great outcome.

“With all the things in the world right now, to have that kind of hope given to a family, is kind of phenomenal especially at Easter.”


Corbitt, a sophomore at the University of South Carolina and a member of the Phi Gamma Delta executive board, will know if his donation was successful within four to six weeks. The Greek connection to this story goes even further, too. While his mom is on the registry, it wasn’t until another organization approached him that he decided to get registered.

Corbitt agreed to sign up through some of the college experience. He is one of the founders of a new fraternity on the USC campus, Phi Gamma Delta, and one of the sororities on campus convinced the fraternity to join with them in working with getting people on the National Registry for Bone Marrow Transplants.

“They do a cheek swab to get on the registry,” he said. “If there’s a preliminary match, they do more testing on the cheek swab. If that goes well, they do blood test.”

Of course, even after signing to be on the National Registry, Corbitt never thought he’d heard from them again.

The surgery was successful and Corbitt was walking around as soon as the very next day. Here’s to hoping the recipient’s procedure is equally as successful.

[via The Daily Independent]

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