Texas State Representative Introduces Bill To Force Texas And Texas A&M To Resume Rivalry

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Nice Move

Football in Texas is serious business.

The University of Texas and Texas A&M University have quite a bit of history together, as any moderate to hardcore college football would know. The two main Texas flagship universities played their first game against each other in 1894, then every year since beginning in 1914 (Texas leads the all-time series 76-37-5). This heated inner-state rivalry concluded after the 2011 season when the Aggies set sail for more fertile soil and calmer waters in the SEC. Texas won their last matchup after a thrilling Texas victory led by amateur videographer/backup quarterback Case McCoy — and just in time for Texas before A&M went from Big 12 also-ran to SEC power.

The end of this historic rivalry is not sitting well with a few key political figures, namely State Representative Ryan Guillen. Guillen introduced a bill that would penalize the program choosing not to continue the Lonestar Showdown.

From The Texas Tribune:

“This game is as much a Texas tradition as cowboy boots and barbeque,” Guillen, an A&M graduate, said. “The purpose of the bill is to put the eyes of Texas upon our two greatest universities to restore this sacred Texas tradition.”

House Bill 778, as filed, does not specify when the game should occur, but it does offer a penalty should it fail to happen: Whichever institution refused to participate in the showdown would suffer restrictions on its athletic scholarships.

Can any other state claim government legislation in regards to enacting college football matchups? Is this even real? It is, and it seems like an overzealous ploy to force a couple football programs on the field that seem to be content in their own, current paths.

That’s Texas, though. Texas loves their football.

[via The Texas Tribune]

Image via Urban Christian News

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