The Average Football Player At A Top School Is Worth Half A Million Dollars

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The call for universities to pay their athletes has reached a fever pitch in the last few years. There are a lot of issues at hand, and the problem is much more complex than either side presents it to be. One thing is for sure, though: the top football schools are making a fuck-ton of money off of their players. Business Insider recently did some math that backs up that assertion.

The website found these schools to have the highest fair market value for their players:

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Business Insider took data on the 10 most profitable programs from BusinessOfCollegSports.com and then combined it loosely with the revenue sharing system implemented by the NFL. After accounting for a 47 percent revenue split going to the players, you end up with the average football player at the most profitable school, Texas, being worth about $605,000. For reference, that’s about four Lambos to get a DUI in, a full semester of a live-in prostitute, or about 18,000 orders of crab legs from Publix. Granted, that’s pretty rudimentary and it assumes all scholarship players would be paid equally, regardless of skill. That’s out of a total of $109.4 million in revenue, which pales in comparison to the $3.8 million they pay out in student aid.

Sure, we’re looking at this as if the huge blue chip recruits wouldn’t be offered essentially max deals versus a walk-on who worked his way up to a scholarship. Even then, just looking at the average really shows you how these programs are just cleaning up when it comes to revenue. But yeah, let’s keep suspending players for signing autographs. That seems like the way to go.

[via Business Insider]

Sterling Cooper is a contributing writer for Total Frat Move and Post Grad Problems. He has never understood why people like sand, and has been in a bitter ten year rivalry with Muggsy Bogues, for reasons neither of them choose to reveal.

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