UNT Kappa Sigma Initiates Korean War Veteran 60 Years After He Was Drafted

Email this to a friend

Nice Move

Screen Shot 2015-04-19 at 3.23.35 AM

It’s something our generation cannot fully grasp. A wartime draft seems as though it’s nothing more than a chapter of your American History textbook. It was only a few decades ago, however, that the draft was much more than a few paragraphs of a lesson, and rather a difficult ordeal affecting millions of Americans.

Jack Marr is a Korean War veteran. He has lived in North Texas his entire life, yet he was unfortunately never officially inducted into the Kappa Sigma fraternity. He was a member of Falcon Fraternity, a group with no national affiliation. During his senior year, the fraternity was accepted by Kappa Sigma, yet the draft came calling and Marr was never able to undergo the Kappa Sigma rituals.

Marr’s focus went from the fraternity to fighting overnight. The major shift took him away from the worries of fraternity life and into those of the real world.


“Uncle Sam knocked on the door real quick,” said Marr with a laugh.

The new graduate was called into the Army and sent to the Korean War for about 14 months.
When he got back from duty, Marr said life quickly began with his wife, career, and an expanding family.

“Different things come up during life you know,” he said, “you’re raising a family and then you have grand kids, now great grand kids.”

This past week, the Kappa Sigma at the University of North Texas received a call regarding a Korean War veteran who was never able to be officially initiated. The chapter sought permission to induct him with their current spring pledge class and were allowed to do so.

This past Saturday, Marr joined men less than half his age in the chapter’s initiation ceremony and officially became a brother of Kappa Sig.

“It’s just been in my heart forever and I finally achieved it today. It’s a thrill, it’s a genuine thrill,” said Marr.

Don’t ever take your letters for granted.

[via NBC DFW]


You must be logged in to comment. Log in or create an account.

Click to Read Comments (23)