Vladimir Putin Might Be Responsible For Your Beer Getting More Expensive

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Nice Move

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So by now, even if you don’t watch or read the news, you have an idea that global oil prices have dropped. You know this because filling up your gas tank no longer costs the same as a new Xbox One game or cover into a Miami club. You blissfully stare at the sale price as the pump stops at a drastically lower number than months beforehand.

Easy Tiger, there’s some repercussions to this oil drop that might affect our wallets elsewhere. Due to the severe price fall in its main export, Russia is in economic turmoil.

“Once again, Jack, I don’t see the problem” you’re no doubt thinking to yourself. “Not our country, not our problem.”

Unfortunately it might soon be our issue, at least at the bar.

From Vox:

In addition to oil and gas, one of the big things that Russia exports is grain. And, as the ruble gets cheaper — thanks to falling oil prices — Russian grain looks more attractive to foreign buyers. That’s good news for Russian farmers, but it means that the ruble-denominated price of bread in Russia is likely to rise sharply. And Vladimir Putin’s administration doesn’t want that to happen, so on Friday the Russian government announced that it would tax grain exports. That keeps the domestic price relatively restrained, but it’s pushing up prices globally.



Russia is a top exporter in wheat and barley, two ingredients used in the malt that makes most of our favorite alcoholic beverages. By trying to curb these exports with a tax, Russia’s affect on the market will be felt, especially in the barley industry.

Ipso facto, booze prices could rise thanks to comrade Putin trying to save the day for Mother Russia.

Was I right or was I right last week when I wrote about Vlad being an adversary worthy of America’s time? Is there anything truly more evil than being the direct reason for beer prices to increase? Exactly. I rest my case.

[via Vox]

Image via Shutterstock

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