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Besides Joe Montana, Notre Dame Has Produced Nothing But Loser QBs

The only thing that I like about Notre Dame is that I can always win money betting against them in Bowl games. Now, with the recent run of shitty products, I can also win money betting against their QBs in the NFL.

Ian Book became the latest loser to come from Notre Dame. He made a start last night for the Saints and was absolutely horrid.

It was the 24th consecutive time a Notre Dame quarterback has lost an NFL start. That is insane.

The last time a Notre Dame quarterback won a game was Brady Quinn… in 2012. When I was 13!

Quinn followed his 2012 Week 13 victory with four consecutive loses, starting ‘the streak’ After that victory, it turned into four consecutive losses. Then Jimmy Clausen was the next loser not winning anything between the 2014 and 2015 campaigns, and an only-in-Cleveland situation, we got 15 straight Ls from DeShone Kizer.

Book got his turn but stunk in New Orleans’ 20-3 loss to Miami on Monday night. The rookie was making his first-career start and completed just 12 of 20 passes for 120 yards. His teammates did not help much as was sacked eight times and intercepted twice, including a pick six on his second throw of the game.

In case you want to keep a longer tally of losers:

  • Brady Quinn: 4-16
  • Jimmy Clausen: 1-13
  • DeShone Kizer: 0-15
  • Ian Book: 0-1
  • Rick Mirer: 24-44
  • Kent Graham: 17-21
  • Steve Beuerlein: 47-55
  • Blair Kiel: 0-3
  • Rusty Lisch: 0-1

That is not good.

“I’ve got a lot to get better at. It’s bad. We didn’t score a touchdown,” Book said after the game.

“You can’t win a game that way.

“That’s a terrible feeling, throwing a pick-six in your debut. I’ve thrown one pick-six in my life, so that sucks.”

What do you think?

Written by Malcolm Henry

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