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Overrated Eli Manning Weighs In On Aaron Rodgers’ Off Season Decision

Eli Manning, easily the most overrated quarterback of all-time, gave his advice to Aaron Rodgers when considering what to do this offseason: stay in Green Bay or retire.

Manning, owner of a career record of 117-117 and a league leader in interceptions three times with zero All-Pro nominations who will make the Hall of Fame because of his last name and two fluke Super Bowl runs, told Rodgers that there is value to staying with one team versus closing a career somewhere else.

“It was important for me to finish my career with the Giants, and I would think it would be important for him as well, just because of the legacy that he has, the history of Green Bay, being there as long as he has been, winning a championship and winning MVPs,” Manning told ESPN. “It’s not always greener on the other side. That’s what I had learned from talking to other people. You can go somewhere, and it’s not necessarily going to be better; it’s probably going to be worse.

Manning continued.

“Usually what happens is the egos get involved. It’s either his ego or the GM’s, and for some reason, that’s when there’s usually separation,” Manning said. “When a quarterback’s been there a long time and leaves, it’s because the egos can’t get along with everybody.

“If Aaron leaves, it’s probably going to be his own call. It’s going to be his decision, saying, ‘I want out of here.’ That’s what he basically said last year is he wanted to get out.”

Rodgers has been in a pretty public spat with the Packers for the last three off-seasons… rivaling the run of contention of will-he or won’t-he that was paced by former Packer legend, Brett Favre.

For that part, Favre also said Rodgers should stay.

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Written by Malcolm Henry

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